Tag Archives: razor

A movie-themed Christmas party

I know the lads who play in the BibleCode Sundays, a really good Celtic rock band from west London. They are a great band and don’t get the recognition they deserve in terms of album sales, but if you go and see them in a pub you will be blown away – and will almost certainly come away as a convert, seeking out their stuff online.

Andy Nolan plays accordian in the band and he has recently written a movie called ‘Clan London’ based on gangland London, particularly in the Irish community. I haven’t read the script, but from what I can see of Andy’s comments online it looks like West Side Story with more violence, more Guinness, and with a bit of Goodfella’s chucked in for good measure.

Andy is already casting the movie and he has a director ready to work on the project, but he is still working on more funding and distribution for the project, so he has organised a big party in Hendon, north London, on Dec 11th.

Guests include Noel ‘Razor’ Smith, world-champion boxer Steve Collins, the director of the film, Stephen Patrick Kenny, and there will be a DJ slot by Tony Lundon of Liberty X. The BibleCode Sundays are going to play a live set as well so it looks like it will be a really good evening, and should focus a bit of attention on the forthcoming movie – both Steve Collins and Razor have agreed to take parts in the film!

The party takes place at the Claddagh Ring in Hendon. Details are all online here. I’m going to be there. Let me know if you plan on coming too!

Drums

Book review: A few kind words and a loaded gun

Noel ‘razor’ Smith has produced an amazing book. It’s a life story, but it reads like a London version of Goodfellas. It describes the need for crime, the ability to use crime as a career choice, and the downsides of time spent in jail – not least the fact that he never managed to create a stable family environment for his wife and kids.
Crime clearly doesn’t pay, but if you want to understand how someone finds crime to be the most attractive career option and then how the code of criminal honour works once inside that life then this is the book for you. Written in a frank and engaging style, it doesn’t pull any punches, but the violence is never glamourised – when punches connect in this book there is hospital and broken bones involved.
My only criticism of the book is that the editor should have looked more closely at some of the simile use. Razor sometimes uses a simile and then uses the same one again within a page of using it earlier. I noticed this a few times in the book, so it could be a little quirk of his writing style, or just that the editor didn’t want to delete any copy with ‘razor’ being the author…!