Tag Archives: migration

Help with my new MacBook

I got a new MacBook recently. One of the things I’ve always loved about Macs is how easy it has always been to migrate from an old one to a new one, but I’m having problems this time – I’d appreciate some ideas.

This is what I did when I got the new computer:

  1. I used Migration Assistant to migrate everything from my old Mac to new Mac using a wireless connection. It was all running fine, but was very very slow. It was going to take about 30 hours. I hoped the estimate was wrong and left it running all night, but the estimate was right. I quit the transfer about halfway through.
  2. I then tried making a complete Time Machine backup of my old Mac and restoring this to my new one. However, the Mac then refused to start up (endless Apple logo) because the two machines have different operating systems.
  3. I tried to use CMD+R while booting to reset the machine to factory settings, so I can start again and do the full migration no matter how long it takes. However, to do a complete reset requires that the Mac downloads the latest copy of the OS and reinstall it so that the Mac will be wiped clean with a new operating system. When I go to select the disk to install the new OS it says the disk is locked… I can’t go on.

So I’m a bit stuck. What I want is just the easiest way to completely reformat the Mac back to factory settings – and if I am already on the right track then how can I ensure the main disk is unlocked.

I haven’t done a thing with this computer yet, it’s just getting frustrating that this time it is taking ages to move on to the new device, yet it is usually so smooth with Apple. Does anyone have any suggestions please?

MacBook light shift

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Don’t start blaming foreign students…

The immigration minister Damian Green has announced a crackdown on students entering the UK from overseas. The intention is to only allow the best and brightest students access to higher education in the UK.
What’s a shame is that this reform of the foreign student entry requirements is being dragged into a nationalistic debate over immigration – the focus being on the thousands of people who remain in the UK long after their course has finished.
Green said: “Why are they staying on? What are they staying on to do? This is part of a wider look we need to take at the immigration system.”
Why are they staying on indeed? Why doesn’t he ask some students to see what they say even as they being their course?
The UK is an attractive place to study. English is the language used for study and daily life, and even though the universities charge non-EU students a lot more than Europeans, a British education remains good value compared to American colleges.
Many students will come to the UK for all these reasons, plus they have a desire to find a job in the UK once they graduate. That doesn’t always happen, but by studying in the UK and having access to employers locally, it can be a strong possibility.
I can understand Green’s desire to control immigration – it’s a populist move – but I don’t think we should be frightened of graduates coming through the university system. Most graduates struggle to find decent work anyway because they have very little work experience, imagine adding the requirement for a work visa to that and you can see that it’s not an automatic gravy train for immigrants.
If Green really wants to target bogus immigration then he should steer clear of the universities and focus on the so-called ‘colleges’ that teach basic IT or English. The teaching quality of many of these colleges is highly dubious, yet a student can enrol on a course and get a visa to stay in the UK – allowing limited working hours.
It doesn’t help the student who might expect a decent level of education, or the UK job seekers who claim that migrants have displaced their jobs. Seek out the bogus colleges, but don’t tar all universities with the same brush – the UK reaps huge rewards from foreign students bringing their skills over here.

Lse library

On yer bike scroungers! Council tenants to get the boot…

The new Work secretary, Iain Duncan-Smith, has caused outrage by suggesting that the unemployed should move in search of work, directing his focus mainly at council tenants who occupy local authority property, claim benefits, and generally don’t do a lot – it’s reminiscent of former Tory minister Norman (now Lord) Tebbit and his famous ‘my old man got on his bike’ speech.

Tebbit is often misquoted, he actually said: “I grew up in the ’30s with an unemployed father. He didn’t riot. He got on his bike and looked for work, and he kept looking ’til he found it.” He was responding to a statement that unemployment naturally leads to riots.

Iain Duncan-Smith is the protégé of Lord Tebbit and that’s easy to see with these new plans about migration. When Tebbit left the Commons for the Lords, Duncan-Smith replacing him as MP, he is alleged to have said: “If you think I’m right-wing, you should meet this guy.”

But there is an issue of structural unemployment in the UK. Jobs are out there, but often the long-term unemployed are not living in locations where suitable jobs are available. What are the thousands of skilled workers  at the former Corus steel plant in Teesside going to do now – work in McDonald’s or deliver newspapers? Hardly fulfilling, rewarding, or exploiting the skills available.

There is already a system that allows people to swap their council home with tenants in another location, though why people in an area full of work might want to move someplace where there is none is beyond me. The unsettling thing about what the government is now proposing is that they want the power to force people to move in search of work.

That’s not like the romantic dream of the American migrant worker. It’s compulsion. And though I am all for the government trying to help people into work, I don’t think that charging up behind vulnerable people with a big stick is a very strategic appeoach.

Everyone wants to get rid of dole scroungers and the long-term sick claiming incapacity benefit and spending it in the pub – that’s a given – but this problem needs more thought than clunking Conservative proposals to force council tenants out of their home. What about their family and support networks? How will a single parent arrange child care in a new city, because they will need it if they are heading out to work fulltime?

I think the more intelligent response to this issue of work distribution would be to approach it with short, medium, and long-term proposals. In the short term, make it attractive for companies to create jobs away from the Southeast – offer tax incentives and grants to make it really worthwhile. Then for the longer term, the only thing that can make the people more mobile and more likely to find work in future is their education and skills. Give them training and let them find new work, don’t kick them out of home because it makes for a good headline on cutting costs.

Wasn’t there that story in the Bible about teaching a man to fish…?

Labour struggling

Please help the Migrant Tales book project!

The Migrant Tales group on Facebook is starting to get some serious interest. Soon after being set up there are already 120 fans of the book and many ideas starting to flow. But we need more.

I’m starting to contact the editors of various diaspora magazines. You know the free magazines you see scattered around London, mainly outside stations, all focused on a specific migrant community. Where I live in Ealing there are several magazines catering to the local Polish community, nearby in Shepherd’s Bush there are mags for the Kiwi and Aussies.

I need your help to reach out to as many of these diaspora publications as possible. I need to reach their editors to tell them about the book project so they can tell their readers – so we can draw more stories and experiences from these people.

Please get in touch with me if you have a copy of any of these magazines to hand and you can send me the contact email for the title – either leave a comment here on this blog or get in touch with me directly…

Thanks for your help in advance!

Migrant Tales – the book

Migrant Tales is a book project being developed by Mark Kobayashi-Hillary and Angelica Mari which will capture real-life stories from the migrant community living in the UK. The aim is to reach out to migrants from all sections of society, wealthy or poor, legal or illegal, successful or struggling.

The media and political parties, with both using populism to gain votes or sales, have simplified the immigration debate. We want to hear the voice, fears, and expectations of the migrant community – along with the experts and policy makers.

The final goal is to paint a picture of how migrants contribute to British life in the twenty-first century, raising awareness of the realities of migration

We are using Facebook to gather real stories from real people. Take a look at the page here. Please also tell your friends and family about this project and the Facebook page.

if you can’t post information to the wall or if you would prefer to speak to us, get in touch with us on:
migranttales@gmail.com

The book takes this as a starting point for the debate:

1. The idea of a “job for life” is dead.
2. You are now competing with people from all over the world for your job.
3. Companies are using the Internet to send work to countries where labour is cheaper.
4. Companies can produce more because of better technology. This efficiency means they need fewer people.
5. Across the UK, the rich are getting richer and the poor are getting poorer.
6. But, if you have the skills, you can migrate and find work in any country.
7. The media and the public complain about immigrants. Experts say immigrants are essential for economic growth.
8. Politicians of all parties want to restrict or ban immigration.
9. Immigration was the most controversial and discussed subject during the 2010 UK general election.
10. If you are not British, but living and working in the UK, what is your contribution to the country?

Please do go and check out the book information on Facebook and contribute if you can.

Mark Kobayashi-Hillary is an author, blogger, and advisor on technology, globalisation and corporate change. He has written several successful management books, including ‘Global Services: Moving to a Level Playing Field’, ‘Who Moved My Job?’, and ‘Building a Future with BRICs’. He is a regular contributor to the British magazines silicon.com and Computer Weekly and blogs about the politics of globalisation for Reuters. Mark is a board member of the UK National Outsourcing Association and a committee member of the British Computer Society ELITE group. He has advised the United Nations on the development of the IT industry in Africa, the Indian government on service exports, and the British government on developing a hi-tech economy. Mark is a visiting lecturer on the MBA programme at London South Bank University.

www.markhillary.com

Angelica Mari is an Italo-Brazilian journalist specialising in business, technology and socioeconomic change. Since the beginning of her career in the late 90s, she held various editorial positions in publications in Brazil until she emigrated to London in 2002.In the UK, Angelica was editor of newswire Unquote, responsible for news on private equity and venture capital in Southern Europe. She also collaborated in the creation of Cleantech – the leading international business magazine in the area of renewable energy launched in 2003 – where she remains as associate editor. Since then, she has positioned itself as one of the leading journalists specialising in management and outsourcing for three years as chief reporter at Computing, the second largest British business technology magazine.
With a solid history of exclusive reporting featuring several FTSE 100 companies, in March 2010 Angelica was invited to join the team at Computer Weekly, the largest enterprise technology publication in the country, as the editor responsible for management and leadership coverage. Angelica also collaborates frequently for publications aimed at the Brazilian community in the UK, such as the magazine Jungle Drums.

http://uk.linkedin.com/in/angelicamari


Who Moved My Job?