Tag Archives: ipod

How many podcasts do you listen to?

I was featured in a podcast this week. It’s always nice to be interviewed and featured somewhere, but even nicer when it’s in a podcast that I actually listen to – and I listen to quite a lot of podcasts. This one was the Live in Brazil podcast hosted by Kevin Porter.

In fact, I was thinking about just how many podcasts I do listen to regularly so I thought it might be interesting to list them all. I do clear out my podcast list when shows are no longer updated so this is pretty much a comprehensive list of the ones I regularly listen to – not just everything I found on my iPod.

Most of the content is from the BBC. That’s really because I don’t know of anywhere that does speech and informative radio as well as the BBC. A lot of this content was originally on the radio and then published as a podcast. Personally I tend to only listen to audio as podcasts now, I don’t really listen to any radio in real-time. And music radio – well for that there is Spotify…

When I write all the podcasts as a list it looks fairly long, but I guess there are people who leave the radio on all day and listen to more programmes than I do. I’m quite selective in what I listen to and I do have specific times when I will listen – walking my dog, out running on the street, in the gym, and work that doesn’t need a lot of concentration (checking emails, Facebook etc…) Obviously I can’t write something while also listening to the news on my iPod.

And one other thing, because I listen on the iPod I can play everything at double speed. That doesn’t work well for music, but for speech radio it means you can get an hour of news in 30 minutes. I have done this so often (and been mocked on the BBC Click programme for it) that when I listen to familiar presenters at normal speed they sound strange!

Do you listen to more? Is this a lot of podcasts to regularly be following?

    • Best of Today; BBC Radio 4 Today programme
    • The Bottom Line; BBC business interviews with Evan Davies
    • Broadcasting House; BBC Sunday news magazine
    • Business Daily; BBC World daily business news
    • Click; BBC technology magazine
    • Crossing Continents; BBC travel and society magazine
    • Desert Island Discs; BBC classic – what music to take to a desert island
    • Discovery; BBC science documentaries
    • Documentaries; documentaries from all across the BBC
    • Drama of the Week; new BBC feature – a weekly radio drama
    • Feedback; forum for radio listener feedback
    • Fighting Talk; BBC sports “quiz” and chat
    • File on 4; In-depth BBC investigative reporting
    • The Film Programme; Weekly film reviews
    • Folk with Mark Radcliffe; Weekly folk music show
    • Football Weekly; weekly football summary
    • Forum – A World of Ideas; Weekly debate about philosophy and ideas
    • From our own correspondent; news reports from foreign correspondents all over the world
    • Front Row Daily; daily arts show
    • Global News; daily summary of global news
    • Great Lives; weekly biography of a “great” person
    • The Guardian Books Podcast; books review
    • The Guardian Film Show; weekly film reviews
    • In Our Time; weekly analysis of history and ideas
    • Listen To Lucy; Lucy Kellaway’s FT column
    • The Live in Brazil Podcast; Live in Brazil with Kevin Porter
    • The Long View; Exploring how the past influences the present
    • Making History; BBC history magazine
    • Mark Kermode and Simon Mayo’s Film Reviews; The best weekly film review show online anywhere… a must-listen
    • Mastertapes; musicians discussing their back catalogue
    • Media Show; weekly media review by the BBC
    • Media Talk; weekly media review by The Guardian
    • Men’s Hour; weekly magazine show
    • Money Box; financial issues
    • More or Less; maths and statistics
    • Music Weekly; Guardian weekly new music review
    • Newshour; daily news summary
    • On the Money; weekly financial analysis featuring CEOs
    • Outlook; real-life stories from the news
    • Outriders; Weekly tech news – Internet focused
    • The Penguin Podcast; Books from Penguin
    • Peter Day’s World of Business; Very good exploration of global business issues
    • Pienaar’s Politics; Excellent weekly summary of British politics
    • A Point of View; Short bursts of thought and philosophy
    • Politics Weekly; Guardian weekly political summary
    • Radio 2 Arts Show; a weekly arts summary
    • Radio 3 Essay; a short essay on the arts
    • The Report; a detailed investigative news report
    • Science Weekly; weekly science focus from the Guardian
    • Sportsweek; a weekly BBC show summarising sport
    • Tech Weekly; Guardian look at tech each week
    • Test match Special; cricket – when games are being played
    • Thanks for Giving a Damn; Excellent US-based musician interviews
    • Thinking Allowed; weekly sociology focus
    • Today in Parliament; what happened in the UK parliament
    • Wake up to Money; Daily financial news first thing in the morning
    • A Week of You and Yours; weekly consumer issues
    • Weekly Political Review; BBC weekly politics summary
    • The Why Factor; asking tough questions – why this or that?
    • Witness; short bursts of interviews with witnesses to great events
    • The World at One; news summary at 1300
    • The World Tonight; news summary at 2200

Enda Mulloy

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French government subsidises music

Why on earth is the French government subsidising music purchases?

They say it is to get people into the habit of purchasing music, rather than stealing it through online file sharing. Did any of the bureaucrats ever consider that French citizens might use up their free allowance and then return to file sharing?

The big issue with music is that we are moving from a world where the consumer paid for a physical recording (LP, CD…), to a digital download (MP3), to access only. That’s right – even the MP3 files on your iPod will seem archaic when the next generation of iPods allows you to choose an artist or song, which it then automatically streams.

Most new TVs are already Internet-enabled, you can flick through YouTube as you watch regular TV. Imagine once car stereos, home audio systems, and iPods are all geared up for constant Internet access? There is no need to ever own a physical music product – you just pay for a song as you play it or pay a monthly access fee allowing you all you want to play.

Spotify uses this model already. The one thing that prevents it becoming the norm is that playback devices are still not ready for streaming-only – most people using Spotify are still playing the songs on their computer. But it won’t be long. It’s common to see streaming jukeboxes in pubs now – a jukebox with every song ever recorded and released. And that is what we will all have at home soon, a sound system with access to every song ever recorded.

The future is how you purchase access to recorded music, not purchasing a copy of recorded music.

Charts will be based on plays, rather than sales, and artists will be (more than ever) focused on live performance, merchandise, and specialist products – like the 78rpm vinyl version of the new Elvis Costello album. Who can even play a 78 these days?

Music is entirely changing and for a government to waste tax-payers money on a scheme that encourages ‘legal’ digital downloads is outrageous.

Trocadero and Eiffel Tower

Thinking Allowed

It’s the European and local council elections here in the UK today. I just went down to the polling station just before 9pm to vote. I’ve had a busy day that started with a 7.30am meeting and I haven’t managed to vote until now. Fortunately, you can vote at anytime up to 10pm.

I was smiling as I walked in to the polling station tonight because I was listening to the ‘Thinking Allowed’ podcast on my iPod. It’s a Radio 4 show about sociology that I really enjoy. It covers all kinds of topics related to society in general and is well worth trying… but this week they were talking about the nature of elections and the apathy of most voters. It made me grin anyway as I was listening to this debate walking up the steps to the polling station, voting card in hand…