Tag Archives: dwp

Foreigners get 77% of new jobs

The Daily Express screamed on the front page today that 77% of jobs in the UK are going to foreigners. It’s a rather typical scare story and I’ve already heard of people waving the paper around today and shouting that all those pesky foreigners are coming to steal our jobs.

But the situation is far more subtle and complex. Even thinking about this for just a few minutes typing this blog I can surmise:

  • We live in the European Union. There is a free movement of labour within the union, meaning we as British people can freely go and live and work in other EU member nations. There are more Brits overseas in the other 26 member states (working, or with family, or retired) than this ‘flood’ of immigrants coming to the UK. So, if the UK decided to suddenly pull up the drawbridge, then what do you think would happen to all those pensioners in Spain or Brits working in France and Germany?
  • Many of the Europeans coming to the UK for work are extremely mobile, which works in their favour. Not many Brits living in Newcastle, and suffering a life on benefits, would jump at the chance of a job in Bristol, or Reading, or even London, if they were only slightly better off. We are not a very mobile society in the UK and this creates structural unemployment where hundreds of thousands of jobs are available, but nobody locally wants to take them.
  • And, in that kind of environment what do you expect will happen? Britain does have a lot of employment available, but it’s not always where people want to work or live. That’s not a problem for someone coming in from overseas who can arrange their accommodation close to their work.

But let’s be clear, these non-British Europeans are not coming in and ‘stealing’ jobs. I’m sure most businesses advertising jobs would be only too delighted to be hiring and supporting local people. But what do the companies do when no locals respond to the job adverts? Go bust because they have no staff? Of course they take the search further afield, and if Brits are not prepared to move 50 miles for a job, then it’s easy to find others within Europe who are happy to work hard, pay their taxes, and add something to the community they move into.

This is not so much a story of foreigners stealing jobs, it’s a story of British people failing to adapt to the international nature of work in the twenty-first century and the DWP not offering enough incentives for those already on benefits to cast the net a bit wider when seeking work.

Election reaction

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SERPS Question

OK, this is one for all you financial advisors out there.

My father is just hitting 65 soon. He already has a pension from a company he worked for – which was for about 23 years from 1979. That company pension was partially money the company put in and partially payments he made in addition.

So he is getting that pension from the company anyway, as he retired early.

Now his state pension is due to start. He got a letter from the DWP people explaining that they are going to pay his pension from September, but it will mean he will get a deduction of almost exactly the same amount from his company pension. They said it’s because he contracted out of SERPS.

The biggest question I have here though, is when was it possible to contract out? And secondly, he was working from the early 60s… there is another 20 years of work and NI payments not connected to this job, so how come the state pension does not reflect that?

Leaders of IT waiting for your questions…

Have you been to a conference recently where Twitter was used to create more interactivity?

I’ve been to a few. It’s easy to do at all the social media events. Just put up a big screen and agree on a hash-tag and everyone will make comments. Whether it’s anything useful is another matter entirely. I’ve also been to some events where Twitter was introduced as a good idea, yet the people in the audience had no idea how to use it despite their supposed status as leaders within the world of IT.
So I was thinking about this when I was asked by the National Outsourcing Association to add some ideas to their annual summer party. It’s usually a great event, full of people from the tech industry, and usually on a London rooftop somewhere drinking in the sun.
The party is going to take place next week on July 15 in London, but the part I managed to add starts from 4pm. It’s going to be some really interesting tech leaders speaking ‘TED-style’ for just 10 minutes each one after the other… so it’s a full-on session of ideas, with questions from the audience all being taken via Twitter.
Take a look at the speakers here. If you want to ask them a question – right now – then just ask it on Twitter and use the hashtag #noaeue. Live commentary of the event will be published on the day on the account @thenoa, so follow that user if you can’t make it in person.
– BBC, Michael Stock, Stretch Project Director, Head of Partnership & Contract
– Department for Work and Pensions, James Gardner, CTO
– Marks & Spencer, Darrell Stein, Director of IT and Logistics
– Symbian, Ian McDonald, Head of IT
– BT, Sarah Manning, Head of Services Improvement and Supplier Management
– Centrica, Kevin Devoy, Manager, Procurement and Supplier Management
– Guardian Media Group, Andy Beale, Technology Director

Tweetdeck - Twitter wall

On yer bike scroungers! Council tenants to get the boot…

The new Work secretary, Iain Duncan-Smith, has caused outrage by suggesting that the unemployed should move in search of work, directing his focus mainly at council tenants who occupy local authority property, claim benefits, and generally don’t do a lot – it’s reminiscent of former Tory minister Norman (now Lord) Tebbit and his famous ‘my old man got on his bike’ speech.

Tebbit is often misquoted, he actually said: “I grew up in the ’30s with an unemployed father. He didn’t riot. He got on his bike and looked for work, and he kept looking ’til he found it.” He was responding to a statement that unemployment naturally leads to riots.

Iain Duncan-Smith is the protégé of Lord Tebbit and that’s easy to see with these new plans about migration. When Tebbit left the Commons for the Lords, Duncan-Smith replacing him as MP, he is alleged to have said: “If you think I’m right-wing, you should meet this guy.”

But there is an issue of structural unemployment in the UK. Jobs are out there, but often the long-term unemployed are not living in locations where suitable jobs are available. What are the thousands of skilled workers  at the former Corus steel plant in Teesside going to do now – work in McDonald’s or deliver newspapers? Hardly fulfilling, rewarding, or exploiting the skills available.

There is already a system that allows people to swap their council home with tenants in another location, though why people in an area full of work might want to move someplace where there is none is beyond me. The unsettling thing about what the government is now proposing is that they want the power to force people to move in search of work.

That’s not like the romantic dream of the American migrant worker. It’s compulsion. And though I am all for the government trying to help people into work, I don’t think that charging up behind vulnerable people with a big stick is a very strategic appeoach.

Everyone wants to get rid of dole scroungers and the long-term sick claiming incapacity benefit and spending it in the pub – that’s a given – but this problem needs more thought than clunking Conservative proposals to force council tenants out of their home. What about their family and support networks? How will a single parent arrange child care in a new city, because they will need it if they are heading out to work fulltime?

I think the more intelligent response to this issue of work distribution would be to approach it with short, medium, and long-term proposals. In the short term, make it attractive for companies to create jobs away from the Southeast – offer tax incentives and grants to make it really worthwhile. Then for the longer term, the only thing that can make the people more mobile and more likely to find work in future is their education and skills. Give them training and let them find new work, don’t kick them out of home because it makes for a good headline on cutting costs.

Wasn’t there that story in the Bible about teaching a man to fish…?

Labour struggling

CW500 Club on Innovation

I went last night to the Computer Weekly CW500 club to hear the Department of Work and Pensions (DWP) CTO, James Gardner, speaking about innovation. I was tweeting during the event on the @cw500 twitter account to ensure that there was a live feed of information about what Gardner was saying. You can read my tweets listed below – the most recent is at the top, so if you want to read them in order then you need to go to the bottom of the page and scroll up.

There will be more comprehensive coverage of the event in the next issue of Computer Weekly – this is just the immediate coverage I was writing online as James was speaking.

James is a very good speaker and once again the CW500 club had a really good event. The speakers only talk for about 10 minutes and then do the rest of the time as an ongoing Q&A with the audience. Why aren’t more events like this?

I did really like his view on innovation, especially the observations around how much academic literature there is out there. We know innovation is good for us, but while things are running smoothly nobody wants to innovate. It always takes a near-death experience to create innovation.

How true. And how refreshing to hear it from a senior guy in the public sector, rather than an innovation ‘guru’ claiming innovation will do everything you ever wanted for your company…

Angelica Mari from Computer Weekly

now its time for drinks… Wine is getting warm
about 21 hours ago via dabr
gardner: all the literature is there but if things are all going ok then why innovate
about 21 hours ago via dabr
gardner: you really need a near death experience or it will never happen
about 21 hours ago via dabr
gardner: innovation units fail because they dont create regular demonstrable returns
about 21 hours ago via dabr
gardner: peer support and recognition and making a diff worth more than money
about 21 hours ago via dabr
gardner: best to co-opt the enemies as you lose political capital fighting all the time
about 21 hours ago via dabr
gardner: therefore most innovation plans die within 18 months
about 21 hours ago via dabr
gardner: focus has to be on keeping the lights on
about 21 hours ago via dabr
gardner: the cio is in a very hard position. Hard to ever innovate
about 21 hours ago via dabr
gardner: if people innovate outside their area they need support
about 21 hours ago via dabr
gardner: you can find people get *too* involved in innovation
about 21 hours ago via dabr
gardner: cultural change is very hard to achieve
about 21 hours ago via dabr
gardner: staff engaged in ideastream are better engaged
about 21 hours ago via dabr
gardner: service is not just functional
about 21 hours ago via dabr
gardner: we expect people to start demanding better interactions soon
about 21 hours ago via dabr
gardner: disconnect between type of service offered and what people expect
about 21 hours ago via dabr
gardner: maybe if we had an art mentality in the dwp rather than engineers it wd be better
about 22 hours ago via dabr
gardner: technologists can build beautiful systems
about 22 hours ago via dabr
gardner: i disagree that technical work is not creative and artistic
about 22 hours ago via dabr
gardner: i dont believe in the single hero innovator #cw500
about 22 hours ago via dabr
gardner: egg or first direct are not just one leader. More than just an idea #cw500
about 22 hours ago via dabr
gardner: if you build it they will come does not happen often
about 22 hours ago via dabr
gardner: network effect really important to get more involved
about 22 hours ago via dabr
gardner: is it to keep up or to get ahead?
about 22 hours ago via dabr
gardner: #cw500 only a few places you can innovate anyway… Radical or incremental
about 22 hours ago via dabr
gardner: not always possible to bring everyone along
about 22 hours ago via dabr
gardner: present environment is a great opportunity for change
about 22 hours ago via dabr
gardner: when you have a burning platform you can make changes
about 22 hours ago via dabr
gardner: you need a near death experience to make innovation happen
about 22 hours ago via dabr
gardner: better to get innovation in a silo than none at all
about 22 hours ago via dabr
gardner: time of austerity… Need to collaborate across public sector
about 22 hours ago via dabr
gardner: if you are going to manage innovation you must be prepared to be fired
about 22 hours ago via dabr
gardner: at lloyds we processed about 1200 new ideas a month
about 22 hours ago via dabr
gardner: most people are resistant to change anyway
about 22 hours ago via dabr
gardner: public sector innovation is no different to private
about 22 hours ago via dabr
gardner: you can shift a direction. Much harder to create radical change
about 22 hours ago via dabr
gardner: what radical innovation has microsoft created?
about 22 hours ago via dabr
gardner: pfizer did a great job repurposing viagra
about 22 hours ago via dabr
gardner: apple just knows the direction of travel and creates paradigm shift
about 22 hours ago via dabr
gardner: apple is not innovating. They are creating revolutions
about 22 hours ago via dabr
gardner: microsoft is a failure in terms of innovation
about 22 hours ago via dabr
gardner: caixa navarra is an amazing example of play to win innovation
about 22 hours ago via dabr
gardner: imagine a bank telling you how much they made from you
about 22 hours ago via dabr
gardner: but most people want play not to lose innovation
about 22 hours ago via dabr
gardner: play to win innovation means you put it at the centre of all you do
about 22 hours ago via dabr
gardner: we ask the crowd to manage the suggestion box?
about 22 hours ago via dabr
gardner: do any suggestion schemes really work?
about 22 hours ago via dabr
gardner: we pay our own currency to staff who have great ideas
about 22 hours ago via dabr
gardner: many of the bank systems i worked on are similar to the dept #cw500
about 22 hours ago via dabr
james gardner cto at dwp now speaking on innovation #cw500
about 22 hours ago via dabr
all present in lancaster hotel now for the #cw500 event
about 23 hours ago via dabr

James Gardner, CTO of the DWP