Tag Archives: beatles

British Festival in São Paulo on 29/09

It’s 50 years since The Beatles released “Love Me Do” – their very first record – so me and Angelica have arranged a Beatles themed British party at a local bar in São Paulo.

There will be live music from 17:00 with a local guitarist and singer warming up the event with Brazilian classics then from 19:00 Daniel Malozzi will be singing classic Beatles – and other British – songs. Check out this video of Daniel singing Eleanor Rigby…

There will be British food such as Cottage pie and bangers & mash, plus British beers, including London Pride and Honeydew.

Between 20:00-21:00 there will be several prize events (Daniel will return to sing again after the prizes):

1. The best three British fancy dress costumes will get original 1962 copies of Love Me Do… worth several hundred R$ each if you can even find a copy in Brazil.

2. Anyone who has registered their name on Facebook will go automatically into a prize draw for Beatles goodies – umbrella, mug etc

3. Anyone who buys food at the event gets a raffle ticket – the raffle winner gets some Beatles goodies

4. The British quiz at 20:00 will cost R$10 per person to enter – the winner takes all the entry money. Last time we did this at the same bar the winner got over R$400.

It’s going to be fun and it’s all British! The singer is great and we have some more surprises for the event too so make sure you come along!

You can find more details and register on the Facebook page for the event here… and why not become a friend of the bar while you are there?

Beatles 7"

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Downfall on a Croydon tram

You know that an online meme has truly gone viral when someone does a Downfall mashup, and so it is that the recent Emma West ‘racist woman on a tram’ video can now be seen in a new version with Hitler – the source video got past 12m views in a few days before the person who uploaded it decided to delete the video. You can still see it all over YouTube though as other people uploaded copies.

It is an embarrassment to watch. West is clearly drunk, or using something you can’t buy at Boots, and making it all worse, she is carrying a young infant who seems oblivious to the foul language and threat of violence. She has now been remanded in custody to January 3rd by magistrates in Croydon – with the order to keep her behind bars apparently for her own safety.

When you take into account her accusation that someone on the tram comes from Nicaragua, though they are quite obviously not from Central America, it descends into idiocy. Just with the added foul language for good measure.

Most reactions to the video have expressed outrage. The UK is a modern, forward-thinking, liberal society that despises this casual racism. At least, this is the intelligent, educated, liberal reaction.

England is also a country where, just a few days ago, police questioned the captain of the national football team over alleged racial abuse of fellow professional footballers on the pitch.

Emma West doesn’t allow her targets to be limited by race; she appears to despise anyone who isn’t English – particularly the Polish – apparently demonstrating that cultural racism very clearly still exists in the UK.

British people know this anyway. The hard working, mostly Christian, white-skinned Poles have faced a negative reaction from the British as their numbers have increased since EU expansion in 2004. Anyone with a slightly longer memory, or appreciation of British history, would know that there were 16 Polish fighter squadrons within the RAF during World War 2, with squadron 303 at Northolt being the highest-scoring fighter squadron in the RAF. But do the ignorant worry about history?

The Irish faced a similar reaction many decades ago as they came to the UK looking for work. Landlords considered dogs and blacks to be just about as welcome as the Christian, white, Irish workers.

Racism isn’t always about the colour of your skin or the God you worship.

Within the British Isles we have often mocked each other in jokes. The drunken Irish, the stingy Scots and so on, but when a video like this achieves such notoriety in such a short period of time it would appear that something else is going on that exceeds mild stereotypes. That John Terry himself can squirm behind excuses such as ‘the context in which certain remarks were made’ shows how little the establishment really cares about true racial harmony in Britain today. Is ‘tolerance’ still the rather pathetic objective here?

The truth is that without migration the UK would never be able to boast the music of Morrissey or the Beatles. The chicken tikka masala might never have become the favourite dish of the nation – offering solace to all those who can’t manage a vindaloo. And Damien Hirst might never have started chopping up cows in the name of art.

The value migration brings is acknowledged by most, and the most recent explicitly anti-migrant political movement, the British National Party, was roundly defeated in the 2010 general election.

But the white working class fears migrants because of the perception that they steal jobs – it’s that simple. They like Irish beer and Indian (usually it’s actually Bangladeshi) food, but they don’t want foreigners coming and taking their jobs.

And jobs are where the political debate is at right now. Unemployment is soaring. The economies of Europe are collapsing and the OECD predicts that the UK will soon enter a new recession with more than 3m unemployed – that’s at least 400,000 more people without a job than right now.

If the government doesn’t grasp that this lack of employment opportunity is going to be a tinderbox that tests multicultural Britain to the limit then I suggest that ministers get on a tram and start talking to people – admittedly difficult when they are not even talking to each other because of Europe. But, don’t forget to carry a swear box.

Hitler In Hell

Google Translate and The Beatles

When The Beatles changed their name from The Quarrymen, it was an amusing play on the words beetle… something dark scurrying around late at night, and beat.

Beatle was never a word in the English language until coined by Lennon and McCartney, so I’m a bit confused by something I noticed on Google Translate.

I went to see the Brazilian rock band Os Paralamas do Sucesso at the weekend. Their name is also something that the band members created just as a laugh – ‘the mudguards of success’.

But try putting that band into Google Translate – if you translate it from Portuguese to English, the band name is translated into The Beatles. Try it – you might need to shorten it to ‘Os Paralamas’ for it to work, but that should still read as the mudguards.

So, were the Beatles known in Portuguese as Os Paralamas or is there an Easter egg within the Google Translate system because someone is a Beatles or Paralamas fan?
Paul McCartney at Hard Rock Calling in London