Tag Archives: band

If you’re in London tonight…

If you are in London tonight and you want to see a great gig then you could do far worse than going to see some mates of mine play at a great venue – the Camden Roundhouse.

This historic venue used to be an old railway shed with a turntable where they could turn engines around. It was also the only British venue that The Doors ever played in – though I never really rated the ‘poetry’ of Jim Morrison myself.

The BibleCode Sundays are supporting the Dropkick Murphys tonight, so at one gig you get to see the best British and American flavours of Irish folk/rock/punk… all in one night. I hope Diageo have supplied extra Guinness to the pubs of Camden for the flood of London Irish that will be on the streets later.

I was supposed to be flying from Brazil to India for a conference next week and I was going to stop in the UK to see this gig, but my travel plans were changed so I’m still at home. It’s a real shame, but I’m working hard to ensure that the BibleCodes get down to Brazil this year – once the London Olympics are over…

Buy tickets for the show here

Farewell Ealing Tweetup…

I wrote on my Computer Weekly blog here about the handover of the Ealing Tweetup to Hayden and all the other regulars at the event. It’s been a lot of fun putting these events together and seeing how the event has grown over time – it’s a shame to say goodbye, but I’m sure it’s going to continue growing because the event has a great amount of momentum behind it now.

When I could see the event getting bigger I thought about how it could easily be sponsored. Getting some free food and drinks would make it more attractive to the regulars and would help to start bringing in a bigger audience.

Of course, getting corporate sponsorship is a double-edged sword. It’s great to get free drinks, but it can be hard to keep something like a Tweetup as an informal gathering once companies start pumping money into the event. They want to know who is attending, what company attendees are from, what position they hold, and especially whether there are any people from the media in attendance – being close to the BBC and Sky in west London that’s been quite a common occurrence anyway.

But I don’t think we ever let the sponsorship take over the tweetup. People have been directed together, go and have a chat to so-and-so, but there has never been a formal name-list, name badges, list of attendees. It’s never been that kind of event and I hope it stays that way, even if it means buying a pint in future.

I’m really grateful to the companies that have sponsored the Tweetup – namely 1e and Xerox. They have all realised that to go ‘too corporate’ would ruin their involvement in the event and instead of people feeling genuine gratitude at their help in pulling together something interesting, there would have been a negative reaction at any over-controlling nature.

I hope future sponsors of this, and similar events, can also see the value in getting positive mentions online and building relationships with the blogging community. Good luck for the future tweetups in Ealing!

Introducing the Ealing Tweetup

Ealing Tweetup has a supporter!

The green power management people with an office in Ealing, 1e, have agreed to support the next Ealing Tweetup on February 15th…!

Ealing Tweetup

1e supported the recent launch of Angelica Mari’s new book in London. Just take a look at the images here to see how much fun that party was – and the great thing is that the same band who played at the book launch will be at the next Tweetup.
Reboot book launch @ Waxy's on Dec 2 2010

Yes, it’s the Biblecode Sundays playing live in Ealing on February 15th… check out this link for more information and to sign up for your place…!

French government subsidises music

Why on earth is the French government subsidising music purchases?

They say it is to get people into the habit of purchasing music, rather than stealing it through online file sharing. Did any of the bureaucrats ever consider that French citizens might use up their free allowance and then return to file sharing?

The big issue with music is that we are moving from a world where the consumer paid for a physical recording (LP, CD…), to a digital download (MP3), to access only. That’s right – even the MP3 files on your iPod will seem archaic when the next generation of iPods allows you to choose an artist or song, which it then automatically streams.

Most new TVs are already Internet-enabled, you can flick through YouTube as you watch regular TV. Imagine once car stereos, home audio systems, and iPods are all geared up for constant Internet access? There is no need to ever own a physical music product – you just pay for a song as you play it or pay a monthly access fee allowing you all you want to play.

Spotify uses this model already. The one thing that prevents it becoming the norm is that playback devices are still not ready for streaming-only – most people using Spotify are still playing the songs on their computer. But it won’t be long. It’s common to see streaming jukeboxes in pubs now – a jukebox with every song ever recorded and released. And that is what we will all have at home soon, a sound system with access to every song ever recorded.

The future is how you purchase access to recorded music, not purchasing a copy of recorded music.

Charts will be based on plays, rather than sales, and artists will be (more than ever) focused on live performance, merchandise, and specialist products – like the 78rpm vinyl version of the new Elvis Costello album. Who can even play a 78 these days?

Music is entirely changing and for a government to waste tax-payers money on a scheme that encourages ‘legal’ digital downloads is outrageous.

Trocadero and Eiffel Tower