What is our FutureStory?

The job for life no longer exists. That’s a fact many of us have become acutely aware of as more and more industries go global. People are migrating, in search of jobs. Jobs themselves are migrating through outsourcing – being sent offshore to other countries using technology such as the Internet.

Sometimes it’s hard to see the good in all this, as the world moves faster and children don’t know what to study because it’s impossible to predict what type of jobs will need what type of qualifications in future. The life of a graduate is anyway very different now. In days gone by all that effort to achieve a degree would have been rewarded with a fairly safe career in a specific industry, possibly even in the same company.

That’s all gone. Your degree will be out of date within a few years, certainly within a decade. Look at India and China. They create over 5m brand new graduates every year. How does the UK compete with that?

FutureStory is an initiative aimed at exploring these questions and connecting local people in their own region to globalisation and what it means to them. The debate around globalisation is often presented in a polarised way – economists supporting the opportunities and campaigners resisting change. FutureStory aims to explore how globalisation really affects people in their own region and how young people can prepare for a global world of work. Rather than stating whether it is right or wrong, the pragmatic view is that globalisation just is. It’s like the sun rising each morning. It just happens.

So, the FutureStory programme aims to help local businesses connect with young people and their teachers to explore where the future jobs are going to come from. It not only allows students the opportunity to explore globalisation with practitioners, but also allows those companies to wake up and explore how globalisation affects the community where they do business.

The question we all need to be asking is, what can I do to succeed in a future knowledge economy? Take a look at the newly-launched FutureStory website here for more information.
Lucy Parker with Tim Smith, Jonny McGuigan, and Mark Churchill from Prudhoe Community High School

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